The Dixon Recycling Program: Why aren’t you recycling your used balls?

In a previous article, we have already extolled the virtues of the exciting new range of Dixon Golf Balls, which give the player the same feel and distance as many expensive top-of-the-range tour standard balls, but which are the world’s first environmentally friendly golf ball.

Already the company has attracted endorsement from a host of celebrities, actors Don Cheadle (star of Hotel Rwanda, Ironman 2 among many others – shown below) and Kevin Sorbo (best known for his role in the television series Hercules) have both been persuaded, as keen amateur golfers, to become celebrity staff members of the Dixon brand.

 

As Golf clubs in general move towards improving their efficiency and reducing their negative effect on the environment, have Dixon hit upon a winner with their latest scheme, the Dixon Golf Ball Recycling program?

 

 

In short, the program offers golfers the chance to change their habits regarding used golf balls, make a greener decision and even earn some money in the process.

Each year in the US alone, over 300,000,000 golf balls are discarded each year alone. This equates to a line of golf balls that would stretch across the globe from Los Angeles to London. Most of these golf balls are not environmentally friendly either, with toxins in the ball coating difficult to break down naturally.

Now Dixon are offering a way to get rid of unwanted or used balls.

Simply take your balls to a registered Dixon recycled shop or course and for every Dixon ball you recycle, Dixon will give you a $1 credit, for other branded balls, Dixon will also give you a $0.50 credit for each one.

Dixon then take all the recycled balls and break them down back into their constituent parts and the resulting materials are then recycled for use in a whole host of ways, such as building robust children’s playground furniture and a vast number of other assorted products, including golf balls and golf equipment.

This outstanding initiative certainly deserves wider press than it is currently receiving and with environmental awareness very much at the forefront of many golf clubs thinking, such a scheme would almost certainly be universally welcomed across both private and public golf courses across the globe.

 

 

Where can I get involved in the Dixon Recycling Program?

Dixon, as the clever advertisement shown below, is rapidly growing as a company and awareness about their environmentally friendly golf products is spreading from their base in Arizona in the United States and across the globe. In Switzerland, for example, Dixon are now official partners with MyGolf, an ideal partnership given that MyGolf organises many events at Lavaux Golf Course, a course designed and built to adhere to the same environmentally sound ideologies that Dixon follow.

 

 

Furthermore, countries across Europe are now taking notice that there is, for the first time, a real, green and ultimately playable golf ball that offers a real alternative to the bigger brands, with no loss in performance and which can, when you have decided your Dixon Ball is finally no longer playable, be traded in for $1 credit on a green replacement, with your old ball then being recycled.

 

It is a stunningly simple initiative and one that we feel as many golf clubs and both professional tours should be keen to become involved in.

So next time you are at your club, why not mention the Dixon recycling plan and what your club is doing to recycle used balls. You could save your members a lot of money if they opt to trade them in, and you’ll be doing the local environment at your course a favour too.

 

Images Courtesy of Dixon Golf Website, Facebook Page

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1

max March 8, 2013

I am all for recycling my golf balls. But unfortunately the usually end up in the water hazards…

2

Tommy Priest March 20, 2013

I know what you mean! But because Dixon does not use “heavy-metals” in the production of their balls, their claim is that the balls are also safer if lost. Dixon has an extremely prgressive environmental policy.

3